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Posts Tagged ‘agile’

The Agile approach in software development: why should you care?

July 26th, 2012 2 comments

Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through 
early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
Manifesto for Agile Software Development, 2001

In recent years, Agile methodology has become increasingly popular in the software industry. The reason is simple— the Agile approach results in increased customer satisfaction. As a consequence, this increases the competitiveness of the development company, and both sides win. As the software market continues to develop and software products and technologies keep expanding into more web and mobile applications, there is a rapidly increasing demand for functionality and quality in developed software, time-to-market and speed of response to customer’s needs. These days customer of software development services can no longer afford himself to ignore the question of how organized the production process is in the development company so that they can know what to expect and when. So, what does “Agile” mean in software development? Is this just another buzzword, or a real chance to meet these new challenges? How it can affect the customer’s business and their ROI? Let’s examine this in more detail.

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Expert approaches vs. miscommunication

April 24th, 2012 6 comments

The modern world is rapidly becoming one where outsourcing is a necessity. Almost everyone is outsourcing software projects to companies that are specialists in software development. That approach brings risks because of the potential for miscommunication. Generally speaking, programmers and business people do not speak the same language. Their respective education is in only one of two different arenas—technology or finance.

An Analyst, or Project Manager (PM) is assigned as the interface between the business/client’s needs and the team of programmers who are physically writing the software. When a misunderstanding takes place, it becomes the responsibility of the Analyst/PM to solve the problem. The problem generally results from one of three possible types of communications failures:

  • The team doesn’t understand the business goal because the Analyst/PM did not understand the needs of the business/client originally.
  • The Analyst/PM is not effectively communicating the needs of the client to the programming team.
  • The team suffers from a communication bottleneck. That is, the Analyst/PM is constantly relying on guidance that is not forthcoming from the business/client in a timely manner.

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